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Indoor Water Conservation

Water conservation in your home is important; be visual of leaks, over usage, and out of date fixtures. For water conservation tips specific to each room of your house, visit our other pages:





                                                                                                                                                                                                                                       

Choosing Water Sense Fixtures and Appliances

WaterSense makes it easy to find and select water–efficient products that can help your wallet and the environment. Just look for products bearing the WaterSense label at your local retailer.

WaterSense labeled products are backed by independent, third– party certification and meet EPA’s specifications for water efficiency and performance. When you use these water– saving products in your home or business, you can expect exceptional performance, savings on your water bills, and assurance that you are saving water for future generations.

Sourced from EPA

Maintenance and Leaks

The average household's leaks can account for more than 10,000 gallons of water wasted every year and ten percent of homes have leaks that waste 90 gallons or more per day. Common types of leaks found in the home are worn toilet flappers, dripping faucets, and other leaking valves. These types of leaks are often easy to fix, requiring only a few tools and hardware that can pay for themselves in water savings. Fixing easily corrected household water leaks can save homeowners about ten percent on their water bills.

To check for leaks in your home, you first need to determine whether you're wasting water and then identify the source of the leak. Here are some tips for finding leaks:

  • Take a look at your water usage during a colder month, such as January or February. If a family of four exceeds 12,000 gallons per month, there are serious leaks.
  • Check your water meter before and after a two-hour period when no water is being used. If the meter changes at all, you probably have a leak.
  • Identify toilet leaks by placing a drop of food coloring in the toilet tank. If any color shows up in the bowl after 10 minutes, you have a leak. (Be sure to flush immediately after the experiment to avoid staining the tank.)
  • Examine faucet gaskets and pipe fittings for any water on the outside of the pipe to check for surface leaks.
  • These WaterSense partners have videos that you might find helpful.
Sourced from EPA
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